MARCH 2014 FAVORITES

The GORGEOUS work of LINE KLEIN.  I am seriously obsessed:

I love all the CANVAS HOME candles, but especially coveting the   Fresh Cut Grass   scent:

I love all the CANVAS HOME candles, but especially coveting the Fresh Cut Grass scent:

For the upcoming Summer season, THIERRY LASRY Sunglasses.

For the upcoming Summer season, THIERRY LASRY Sunglasses.

After the Winter we had, I hope I'm not the only one with 0% moisture in my skin.  This Coriander scent lotion is so luxurious and smells absolutely amazing.

After the Winter we had, I hope I'm not the only one with 0% moisture in my skin.  This Coriander scent lotion is so luxurious and smells absolutely amazing.

It's not quite picnic season, but I'm already on the hunt for outdoor accessories (especially when they're this cute).

It's not quite picnic season, but I'm already on the hunt for outdoor accessories (especially when they're this cute).

Newly discovered (by me): A new take on your TED TALK obsession, 99u has endless talks and articles for "empowering the creative mind."

A LOOK BACK AT SEPTEMBER

September was full of new experiences.  I spent some time in Chicago (for the first time) meeting my fellow editors of Clementine Daily, and the site officially launched.  It has been a long, busy and very fulfilling month.  Here's a small look into what September looked like for me, and some FAVORITES (finally)!

UPSTATE: I found out about these amazing textiles via Andrea Gentl's site, Hungry Ghost Food + Travel.  After browsing their extensive store ranging from home goods to clutches, I fell in love with their indigo-heavy line.  Be sure to take a look at their past lookbooks -- I sort of want this entire collection head to toe.

AMERICA'S TEST KITCHEN PODCAST: I've been listening to this podcast for a long while, but I can't get over the amazing amount of knowledge I absorb in their weekly, 45 minute podcast.  I have the feeling America's Test Kitchen as a brand has a sort of bad rap.  It's maybe not as *flashy* or cool as some other food sources, but these people are serious cooks.  I've learned so many basic fundamentals of baking and cooking from listening and am constantly inspired by their scientific knowledge and recipe-testing vigor.  Not only do they know what they are talking about, but they are constantly trying to simplify and demystify cooking for the home cook.  It's a purpose to stand by, for sure.

I know I've talked about this company enough, but I am continually inspired by my weekly box from Quinciple.  I've recommended it to so many friends, and am really trying to spread the word since it completely changed my home cooking life.  Each week, I look forward to getting an eclectic variety of products from eggs, cheese, fruits, vegetables to pasta, bread, grains, etc!  The list goes on and on.  I've had a CSA before and I found the experience good, but not great. I felt I got a lot of the SAME types of produce over and over again and found myself unable to stomach that many lbs of summer squash or beets.  Quinciple gives you the variety of the farmer's market, supporting so many farms and small artisans as well as receiving some things maybe you wouldn't have picked up yourself.  It has made me and some of my friends try and cook things we have never before.  I mean, have you ever had FRESH fennel seeds? I can't say enough good things about this company.  Check them out! 

FOOD52 Provisions:  We all died over the launch of this amazing shop bred from the dynamic Food52 duo, Amanda Hesser and Merril Stubbs.  The newness of it is old news, but I am finding this shop (AND SITE) is getting better with age.  I've been reading it for years, but am so impressed by the varying authentic content they create.  Now, they sell actual products? This is dangerous.  This site and shop is aging like Gary Oldman, so get ready to be continually seduced.

Noah Fecks and Paul Wagtouicz have outdone themselves again.  Not only was their blog a complete overnight success with its fascinating premise, but now they have spread the love and created a seriously satisfying look into food history through the eyes of contemporary chefs.  Over 100 contributors took on the amazing "assignments" given for this book and fortunately I was one of them.  We each submitted a recipe based on a year and historical event.  I'm not going to give it all away, but my recipe is based off the year 1900 and involves cherries and Chekhov.  Please read and buy this book, if not for me, but for all the other wonderful contributors and even moreso, the two talents behind the book.